Friday, October 1, 2010

Pied-billed Grebe


The fall migration is in full swing here in Minnesota and one of the birds that we often see around this time of the year, as well as early spring, are the pied-billed grebe. The Dakotas, Minnesota and Wisconsin offer a lot of excellent habitat for the waterfowl to use as a stop over on their long flights. The many lakes, rivers, ponds and other wetlands offer a place where they can find food and rest.
Fall is fun, because it is a great time to observe immature birds who are making the trip for the first time. Pied-billed grebes nest through out most of North America and Central America as well as the southern portions of South America. Many stay on their breeding grounds all year round, but those that nest in the northern portions of their range, Canada, the Great Lakes area and Midwest United States, migrate south for the winter.
Immature grebes usually stay fairly close to an adult. The adult keeps a wary eye out for danger and will also feed the young fish, crustaceans and aquatic insects. If danger is near the grebes will sink under the water instead of flying away. The young will follow the lead of the adult. These pics were taken at Crex Meadows in Wisconsin.

10 comments:

Abraham Lincoln said...

I am, like you, anxious to see what comes through our area on the fall migration. Your photos of the grebes are excellent.

Kate said...

You are not only a fine photographer but an excellent educator as well. You make me want to learn more about birds! Time for Hawk Ridge again!

Misty Dawn said...

I agree with Kate completely! Your blog posts are always beautiful and intelligent. It's a joy to visit your blog.

Kay L. Davies said...

What a wonderful way to get to see birds I've never seen before. Thank you so much!

Kay
Alberta, Canada

Denise said...

Lovely post about these migrating birds.

ladyfi said...

Lovely shots!

Mama Zen said...

Lovely shots!

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

Nice shots, good information.

Coy said...

Excellent photos!

I love how these little critters can slowly sink beneath the surface without diving.

Country Mouse Studio said...

That first photo is one unusual looking bird