Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Harris Hawk

Harris Hawk
 The Harris hawk is a medium sized hawk that is found in North and South America. They typically live in hot arid climates and as such do not migrate. In North America they are found primarily in the southwest, south Texas and Arizona, and Mexico. Harris hawks are some times found well outside their range. This is typically due to falconry birds that escape and become feral, since Harris Hawks are very popular falconry birds.
Harris Hawk Immature
 Harris hawks nest in small trees, scrub bushes or cactus. The female usually builds the nest which is sticks and plants and lined with leaves or moss. Clutch size is usually 2 to 4 eggs which are incubated primarily by the female for 30 to 36 days before they hatch. When the chicks hatch they are bald, blind and helpless. It will take about 45 to 50 days before they are able to fledge. Since Harris hawks breed in climates that do not change much in the winter the females will sometimes breed two to three times a year.
Harris Hawk Family
The Harris hawk is more social then most other raptors. Typically raptors are loners tolerating other raptors only when breeding but Harris hawks often live in small social groups. Often breeding groups consists of a couple of adult males and one female. Immature birds will sometimes stay with their parents for two to three years helping to feed and raise new broods. Since there are not a lot of trees in the habitats in which they are found they will often perch on each others backs, called stacking. They will also hunt in a group using some of the same pack hunting techniques as lions and wolves. Harris hawks that hunt in a group are much more successful then those that hunt on their own.


11 comments:

Andrea said...

Wow and Wow ... I know about the Harris Hawk, but I learned more from you today. They are beautiful and I love that they are social. Thanks for the information EB. Have a wonderful week ...

Andrea @ From The Sol

Reader Wil said...

Thank you for telling about this interesting species. I always learn a lot from you.
Wil, ABCW Team

Roger Owen Green said...

a hawk hangout!

ROG, ABCW

New York Erratic said...

Wonderful and informative! I've heard of the Harris hawk in documentaries before.

Wally Jones said...

Very nice article on a beautiful raptor!

Norma Ruttan said...

so that's medium-sized! The hawk still looks HUGE to me. Hawks are such a regal looking bird.

Margaret Adamson said...

Hi Jeff Thanks for an informative post with great photos.

Kim said...

So, I'm not likely to see a Harris hawk in Minnesota?

Mary Howell Cromer said...

Incredible beauty, just grand shots. A friend of mine got to hold one at a nature center a few years ago, and my green eyes became even greener ;)

ChrisJ said...

I am still trying to identify hawks round here. I know the Cooper's Hawk because we have quite a few of them, but others are few and far between. Since I don't get out a lot, I rely on those that frequent our creek and woodland.

Abner Crux said...

I feel like there is a group of 3 Harris Hawks hunting in my area -but I am in Minnesota. Is this possible?