Saturday, August 29, 2009

Today's Flowers: Crown Vetch

Crown vetch is not actually a true vetch. Crown vetch is an invasive member of the pea family. It was originally brought to North America from Eurasia and North Africa and used as an ornamental plant and for erosion control. Its creeping growth and ability to provide dense growth, by spreading through rhizomes, makes it well adapted for road bank stabilization. However these same factors are what makes this plant highly invasive. The fruit of the crown vetch are pods which are about 2 inches long and contain approximately 12 seeds in each. Crown vetch provides excellent forage for many different types of wild animals including deer, turkey, pheasants, and rabbits. For this reason some people have considered using it as forage in livestock pastures. While it is comparable to other forms of grass legume pastures crown vetch can be toxic to horses. Nitroglycosides in the plants can cause impaired growth, paralysis or even death in horses that consume large amounts.

12 comments:

Gill - That British Woman said...

that is such a pretty flower.

Gill in Canada

Carletta said...

Lovely yet sometimes deadly. :)
Wonderful info you've given us.

My post is here: Carletta’s Captures.

Regina said...

Love this so pretty.

Gunilla said...

Beautiful flower. Thanks for the information.

Gunilla in Sweden

Pagan Sphinx said...

Pretty but we've learned that importing plants and birds (like the swans we have in our river) for ornamentation is not a very good idea. Thanks for mentioning that.

Pagan Sphinx said...

P.S. Do you know about Think Green Thursday? It's an environment meme that your work would be perfect for, I think.

The link is on my blogs.

i beati said...

always reminds me a little of a sweet pea

VALKYRIEN said...

That's a beautiful flower! Great post with interesting info! Thank you for sharing!

Leora said...

Too bad such a pretty plant is an invasive.

guild-rez said...

Nice pictures of Crown vetch..It is a member of the Pea or Fabaceae family. This low growing vine is commonly used throughout the United States for erosion control, roadside planting and soil rehabilitation.

Arija said...

Thank you very much for this most informaive post. I enjoy your impeccable research very much and was also impressed for the same reason, by your butterfly post.It is only too true that once we know what to look for, identification is so much easier. Your Photography as always is great.

Judy said...

Beautiful photo, and information as well!! And I read about a lot of birds and butterflies, too!