Sunday, December 13, 2009

Robber Fly

When I began photographing wildlife I started by mostly photographing raptors and mammals. As time went by I branched out and began to photograph all sorts of birds, not just raptors. After I started the blog and my interest branched out again and I began to photograph butterflies and dragonflies, but I did not stop there. I now stop to photograph any interesting insect that I find while I am out shooting, like this robber fly that I photographed at Wild River State Park back in August of 2008.

Robber flies are part of the Asilidae family which contains over 7000 species world wide. Robber flies all have two large compound eyes, bristles protruding from their face, and a stout beak like mouth. They use this beak, proboscis, to inject their prey with neurotoxin and proteolytic enzymes which paralyze the prey and break down its insides so that the robber fly can drink the protein though it's proboscis. Typical prey includes flies, grasshoppers, beetles, moths, dragonflies, damselflies, butterflies, bees and other insects.

6 comments:

madcobug said...

I used to see those all the time but haven't seen one in years, Didn't know what they were called. Great shot! Helen

Jama said...

I love photographing those little insect too,as long as they stayed long enough for me to grab my macro lens! this is an awesome macro.

awarewriter said...

Glad those critters don't feed on people. Shudder. As always, your photo and your words are excellent.

teresa said...

Very interesting, ugly, but a great picture. Nature is an amazing artist. The shot really shows the detail.

SquirrelQueen said...

Great macro, what an interesting creature. Thank you for the information.
The Road to Here

Misty Dawn said...

I think Robber Flies are outstanding photography subjects. I have many photos of them.