Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Eastern Towhee

Eastern Towhee
The eastern towhee is a large colorful sparrow found through out the eastern half of North America. At one time they were considered the same species as the spotted towhee, which is found in the western half of North America, and were called the Rufous-sided towhee. However even though they do sometimes cross breed where the species over lap in the middle of the continent they are different enough to be considered two separate species.

video

The name towhee comes from a description of one of the birds common calls. Towhees usually spend most of their time in the undergrowth foraging for seeds, fruits and insects. The best time that you have a chance to get a good look at them is when they perch in a tree or bush to sing. Males often have a number of different songs that they sing.





14 comments:

Modesto Viegas said...

Good post, and a nice bird!

photowannabe said...

I didn't know they were part of the sparrow family.
Good video clip.

Roger Owen Green said...

handsome creature
ROG, ABC Wednesday team

EG CameraGirl said...

I love listening to them sing!

mick said...

Beautiful photo with the bird against the blue sky.

Mama Zen said...

Pretty shot!

ChrisJ said...

I'd love to see the Eastern Towhee. We have a family of California Towhees that have lived in our junipers for several of their generations.

PhenoMenon, ABCW Team said...

Call me a geek but the first picture reminds me of "Angry Birds" !! Nice snaps


PhenoMenon, ABCW Team

catsynth said...

Beautiful picture of the towhee, and I love hearing its song as well! It's nice to hear bird songs after so much continuous time in the city.

Rambling Round said...

I think he likes to talk!

Linda said...

I love that shot - and the video was great! It was nice to hear the song!

Jean said...

I am also lucky to have them visit my yard/garden. Wonderful birds to feature. Your photo and video promotes this handsome bird well!

Stewart M said...

Hi there - splendid pictures (and video). It interesting how the species status of birds changes over the years - especially for birds that can interbreed. If these species do interbreed are the young fertile?

Cheers - Stewart M - Australia

PS: thanks for the links to WBW

Mary Howell Cromer said...

Love these Towhees. We have them, but they are scare for right now, but soon, they shall be making that amazing voice be known~